George Soros’ Mentor, Jesuit Trained

Research credit to Joshua Poore.

george-soros

George Soros’ mentor was a man named Karl Popper.

“In 1947 Soros immigrated to England and became a student at the London School of Economics.[24] While a student of the philosopher Karl Popper, Soros worked as a railway porter and as a waiter.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Soros

karl_popper

Karl Popper was Jesuit trained at the University of Vienna.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Popper

“Being considered a Papal Institution, the university suffered quite a setback during the Reformation. In addition, the first Siege of Vienna by Ottoman forces had devastating effects on the city, leading to a sharp decline, with only 30 students enrolled at the lowest point. For King Ferdinand I, this meant that the university should be tied to the church to an even stronger degree, and in 1551 he installed the Jesuit Order there. With the enacting of the Sanctio Pragmatica edict by emperor Ferdinand II in 1623, the Jesuits took over teaching at the theological and philosophical faculty, and thus the university became as stronghold of Catholicism for over 150 years.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Vienna

 

 

Can a Geocentrist Use the Celestial Sphere as His Firmament? Nope!

Medieval Theologians attempted to synchronize the Greek Geocentric Two Sphere Model with Scripture, such as the model above presented by the Venerable Bede.

Is this an honest description of the firmament mentioned in Genesis 1? No way!

Gen. 1:7 states, “And Elohim made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament: and it was so.”

Here we have the firmament and the heavenly waters relating to a plane interface not a round or spherical interface. Notice the waters are not around the Earth and around the firmament. They are under and above the firmament. This denotes a flat plane interface. The word under here is the Hebrew tachath, Strongs H8430. The Lexicon states,

“The KJV translates Strongs H8478 in the following manner: instead, under,for, as, with, from, flat, in the same place.”

https://www.blueletterbible.org/lang/lexicon/lexicon.cfm?strongs=H8478&t=KJV

Interesting that this word is never translated as around but is actually translated flat on one occurrence! This is devastating because the waters under the firmament in verses 9-10 are said to be on the same level as the land! Yah just called the Seas flat!

Much the same can be derived from an examination of the Hebrew word translated above:

https://www.blueletterbible.org/lang/lexicon/lexicon.cfm?Strongs=H5921&t=KJV

This is why we read in Gen. 1:2, 29 that the Earth has a face and the waters have a face. That is because they are a plane interface.

Thus we read in Gen. 1:14-15 that Yah also made the celestial bodies to give light upon the earth, also denoting a plane interface as we read in Ecclesiastes that we are UNDER the Sun. We are not rotating around the Sun according to the Bible. This again denotes a plane interface.

Thales’s(624-546 B.C.) Spherical Earth

“Thales’s Spherical Earth

Modern commentators assume that Thales regarded the earth as flat, thin, and circular, but there is no ancient testimony to support that opinion. On the contrary, Aristotle may have attributed knowledge of the sphericity of the earth to Thales, an opinion which was later reported by Aëtius (Aët. III. 9-10) and followed by Ps.-Plutarch (Epit. III.10). Aristotle wrote that some think it spherical, others flat and shaped like a drum (Arist. Cael. 293 b33-294 a1), and then attributed belief in a flat earth to Anaximenes, Anaxagoras, and Democritus (Arist. Cael. 294 b14-15). If following chronological order, Aristotle’s words, ‘some think it spherical’, referred to the theory of Thales. Aristotle then followed with the theory of Thales’s immediate Milesian successor, Anaximander, and then reported the flat earth view of Anaximenes, the third of the Milesian natural philosophers.

There are several good reasons to accept that Thales envisaged the earth as spherical. Aristotle used these arguments to support his own view (Arist. Cael. 297 b25-298 a8). First is the fact that during a solar eclipse, the shadow caused by the interposition of the earth between the sun and the moon is always convex; therefore the earth must be spherical. In other words, if the earth were a flat disk, the shadow cast during an eclipse would be elliptical. Second, Thales, who is acknowledged as an observer of the heavens, would have observed that stars which are visible in a certain locality may not be visible further to the north or south, a phenomena which could be explained within the understanding of a spherical earth. Third, from mere observation the earth has the appearance of being curved. From observation, it appears that the earth is covered by a dome. When observed from an elevated site, the sky seems to surround the earth, like a dome, to meet the apparently curved horizon. If observed over the seasons, the dome would appear to revolve, with many of the heavenly bodies changing their position in varying degrees, but returning annually to a similar place in the heavens. Through his work in astronomy Thales would almost certainly have become familiar with the night sky and the motion of the heavenly bodies. There is evidence that he gave advice to navigate by Ursa Minor, and was so involved in observation of the stars that he fell into a well. As a result of observations made over a long period of time, Thales could have realized that the motions of the fixed stars could not be explained within the idea of the observable hemispherical dome. During the determination of the size of the rising sun, and again while watching its risings and settings during his work on fixing the solstices, Thales may have realized that much natural phenomena could be explained only within the understanding of the earth as a sphere.

From the shore, a ship can be seen to be descending, gradually, below the horizon, with the hull disappearing from view first, to be followed by masts and sails. If one had a companion observing from a higher point, the companion would see the ship for a long period before it disappeared from view.

Aëtius recorded the different opinions of the shape of the earth that were held by Thales, Anaximander and Anaximenes (III.9-10; III.10; and III.10). Cicero attributed to Thales the earliest construction of a solid celestial globe (Rep. I.XIII.22). Thales’s immediate successors proposed theories about the shape of the earth which were quite different from each other, but that is no reason to reject the view that Thales hypothesized a spherical earth. It is not the only occasion on which Anaximander and Anaximenes failed to follow the theories of Thales. That they did not do so is the main argument in favour of accepting that the scientific method commenced in the Milesian School. There is testimony that Thales knew the earth to be spherical, but no evidence to suggest that he proposed any other shape.”

http://www.iep.utm.edu/thales/#SH6b